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01.27.2010

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San Fernando Pantheon
Attractions of Mexico City

Address: Constituyentes on the corner with Panteón Civil
Area:
Chapultepec
Metro: Constituyentes

Protected by an elegant colonnade, the San Fernando Pantheon, a place that mixes mystery, memory and remembrance, shelters the remains of some of the most influencial personalities in Mexico's history from the 19th Century, among which rest those of Benito Juárez.

The San Fernando Pantheon is located next to a temple of the same name in the western side of Mexico City's Historical Centre, in the Guerrero Neighbourhood.

This cemetery was originally a part of the Temple of San Fernando complex which was expropriated after the dissolution of the fernandine order in 1860 as a result of the country's transformations after the Reform War; the government needed to obtain resources with which to finance the country's reconstruction and the complex was expropriated so as to take advantage of the goods that had remained static and underused in the dead hands of the clergy.

Of the original complex only the temple and cemetery survive to this day, and after the latter was shut for general use to the public in 1871, it was destined to shelter the illustrous personalities of the time, however different their ideologies. Some of these personalities are Ignacio Zaragoza, Melchor Ocampo, Tomás Mejía, Miguel Miramón, Leandro Valle, Jose María Lafragua, among others. Each one of their tombs consitutes a tribute to their memory, expressed through enigmatic and subtle monuments, which generate an area of great solemnity charged with a unique atmosphere.

Of special interest is the mausoleum in which lie the remains of Benito Juárez, which was inagurated by Porfirio Díaz in 1880. The mausoleum is built in marble and stands on a sober space, done in neoclassical style.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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