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09.04.2009

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Teotihuacan
Images of Teotihuacan / Archeological sites

Teotihuacan, which in the náhuatl dialect means “The City of the Gods” or “The place in which the Gods are made”, is one of the most impressive places in the country and in the world, it is the place in which the spiritual and material knowledge of the mesoamerican towns, generated the highest architectural, urban and artistic expression in America.

The history of Teotihuacan starts towards the year 600 b.C., when some of the small agricultural villages in the Valley of Mexico started to specialize in the manufacture of several products, which with time, they began exchanging with neighboring villages and by the year 200 b.C. these villages settled in the area and contributed its own philosophies and knowledge in the production of jewelry, vases, tools, etc., which generated a great cultural and commercial effervescence, that with the passing years, would motivate the influence of the teotihuacan culture to spread to all the corners of Mesoamerica.

As an example of the high degree of civilization that this culture achieved, some of the most impressive prehispanic edifications remain today, like the Pyramid of the Sun (the second largest in Mexico), the Pyramid of the Moon and the Temple of Quetzalcóatl, among others, all of them lined around a great avenue more than 2 km long that has been named “The Street of the Dead” due to the large number of small pyramids that can be found at its sides, which the first archeologists who explored the area thought to be mausoleums.

A great number of palaces can be found in this archeological site, like the palace of Quetzalpapalotl and several very well conserved murals which narrate, in a very refined and beautiful way, the vision that this culture had of the world, same which disappeared in a mysterious way, it seems, by a series of climate-related and social factors that caused their downfall towards the 8th Century a.d.

The impressive archeological site of Teotihuacan is located to the north of Mexico City and can be accessed through the motorway to Pachuca. In this archeological site, as in Cuicuilco or Chichen Itzá, festivals take place on the day of the spring equinox.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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